Spokes of the Wheel

Amazing how the spokes of my blog’s metaphorical wheel offer traction for other folks. Today I received an email from a lass who said she recognizes what it feels like to self-silence: she had read my blog on Dana Crowley Jack’s book about silencing the self.

Other folks have picked up my ruminations and re-posted them, and I recently found my opinion-editorial about cigarette packaging and persuasion popping up all over the internet.

My work connections pale in comparison to champion bloggers like Rebecca Skloot or Facebook pal Rob Schmidt, but it’s kinda cool to see my stuff on a blog for federal court rulings, on tobacco.org and health alerts.

My little ditty about what we can learn about relationships from prairie voles was picked up a website for biologists and my blog is listed (among others, like Science Friday) for folks interested in science communication.

My blog even got a shout-out in Scientific American.

What began as a project during my fellowship with the Smithsonian in 2010 to focus my energies on Native science has expanded into thoughtful commentary on ways of looking at the world. Not just ways of knowing, but ways of feeling.

And the blogs that get the greatest responses aren’t the ones about theory, epistemologies and ontologies.

People respond warmly to heart-felt loss and discovery, and to my personal stories.

Seems that your need to burrow down to the bones to get to the crux of the matter, and that’s what resonates with readers.

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About Cynthia Coleman Emery

Professor and researcher at Portland State University who studies science communication, particularly issues that impact American Indians. She is enrolled with the Osage tribe.
This entry was posted in Indian, Native Science, science communication and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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