Author Archives: Cynthia Coleman Emery

About Cynthia Coleman Emery

Professor and researcher at Portland State University who studies science communication, particularly issues that impact American Indians. She is enrolled with the Osage tribe.

A Postcard or a Tweet?

Today I read a news story about a comedian whose death was announced by his son on Twitter. Rather than Twitter, I would like my death announced by postcard. I learned the art of postcard writing from my mum, who … Continue reading

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In the Age of Uncertainty and Dread, Who Benefits?

Cui Bono  Forgive my cynicism. But the pandemic news coverage spreads uncertainty and dread, and makes me cynical. Here are some headines: Will Covid-19 mutate into a more dangerous virus? (Britain) Needless Suffering and Death if States Open too Soon … Continue reading

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A Virus and an Epiphany

As our spring course in mass media framing entered its final throes a few weeks ago—before universities decided to offer courses remotely or virtually—I noticed a clutch of students was hanging out in the classroom, even though the final bell … Continue reading

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Hello: I’m the Ambassador of North America

If you are an American citizen who grew up overseas in the 1960s and 1970s, you were told by your parents and by the American community—the official and unofficial community, and by the US military and the civilian community–that you … Continue reading

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Shining the Light

The Story about Owl and the Mullah It only took about 30 minutes to pop my belongings into a shopping bag after cleaning out my temporary office at Vancouver Island University. If I’m poor in material artefacts, I am rich … Continue reading

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Stereotypes about American Indians

The More the Buckshot, the More the Brains [Today I’m sharing with you notes from a talk I gave this week at Vancouver Island University in British Columbia. My notes serve as a foundation for the talk, which was less … Continue reading

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Smuggery and Consumption

LITTLE THEORIES As the busiest shopping day of the year approaches, I take a deep breath. I’m as guilty as any shopper. If I can get an item delivered to my door in 24 hours, I’ve saved time and pennies. … Continue reading

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This University President is Indigenous

Regalia Regalia We got an invitation to attend the inauguration of the university president at Vancouver Island University in November. It is not every day that my husband and I get to witness such an important event. What made the … Continue reading

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Buckshot for Brains

Is all Communication Persuasive? (Note: My fellowship at Vancouver Island University allows me to meet students and faculty across campus, and I was delighted to talk about how early studies of human skulls and brains affects ways discourse transmits notions … Continue reading

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Lost, now Found

I got lost in the woods. On my way to and from work I trek through the woods to catch my bus. The shortcut offers a view of the cedars and firs, and a variety of mushrooms I’ve rarely seen: … Continue reading

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