Author Archives: Cynthia Coleman Emery

About Cynthia Coleman Emery

Professor and researcher at Portland State University who studies science communication, particularly issues that impact American Indians. Dr. Coleman is an enrolled citizen of the Osage Nation.

When First Place is More than a Win

If you live in Portland, you know it’s time for the Tour de France if you have a coffee and croissant at our local boulangerie. The owner streams the event every year. That’s one reason I love living in this … Continue reading

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Lockdown for Mice

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Lockdown for Mice

When Hurricane Sandy hit the Eastern United States in 2012, the seaside town where my husband’s parents lived lost power. They survived weeks without heat in November and December, thanks to a gas range that warmed the kitchen and let … Continue reading

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The New Normal

My pandemic months were normalized by my spartan wardrobe. I rotated the same three pants over many months—gray then navy and now black—and alternated colored tops for my zoom lectures and staff meetings. Getting dressed was mindless. And normal. Now—as the … Continue reading

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Find the flamingo and you’ll find the lampshade

I broke a lamp when I was moving items on my desk for a home zoom call. The vintage-glass shade hit the wooden table and cracked to bits. I asked my husband where he put the old shade—the one that … Continue reading

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Deb Haaland’s Appointment is Critical

When Joe Biden nominated Representative Deb Haaland of New Mexico to direct the Department of the Interior, social media posts buzzed. My American Indian friends and relatives have been rooting for Haaland for weeks, hopeful a Native American would head … Continue reading

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Creating Meaning in an Age of Disinformation

View Post This week I had an opportunity to be part of a conversation about mass media, disinformation and journalism with media specialists from Morocco and Africa. I was excited to talk with an international group about issues I confronted … Continue reading

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Thanksgiving: Whose Prosperity?

              This week we are studying a confluence of tragedies that signaled a turning point for Native American life at the end of the 1800s.               Our college lessons just happen to fall in the same week as Thanksgiving, and … Continue reading

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Why Resilience Matters

I’m lucky to be alive, and glad to be here—particularly in the throes of a disease that has killed some 227,000 Americans. That’s the entire population of the city of Spokane in Washington or Richmond, Virginia. As one governor said … Continue reading

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Columbus Day: Settling of the New World Drenched with Hype

Some communities—including Portland, where I live—have swapped Columbus Day for Indigenous Peoples Day. And while the two tributes aren’t quite equivalent—one commemorates an individual credited with the sighting of the New World, while the other recognizes Native peoples of the … Continue reading

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