Monthly Archives: March 2013

Coffee

I love the science section published each Tuesday in the New York Times. And I hate it, too. A delicious story emerged this week about folks who live on the island of Ikaria, off the mainland of Greece.

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Congress Takes Anti-Science Stance

This week Congress approved the budget bill that funds science research while axing dollars for social science. Specifically political science. The news is heart-breaking for those of us who work on the softer side of science. It’s dumbfounding that anyone … Continue reading

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Nibbled to Death by Ducks

One of my colleagues said working in university administration is like being nibbled to death by ducks. And this week a world leader said if you’re popular in your job, you’re probably not doing a good job. Result: some poor … Continue reading

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Science Ethics Redux

Henrietta Lacks is back in the news. Lacks’ story captured headlines after Rebecca Skloot’s 2010 book revealed the dying mother had her cells removed for science—without her permission. Doctors at Johns Hopkins hospital had tried unsuccessfully to keep alive human … Continue reading

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Spam, Spam Spam

I am as well cheerful to share my familiarity. That’s what the message says. When I created my blog the designer—Melissa Shavlik—set up the communication so I would hear from readers.

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Maggots for Medicine

Maggots—the offspring of flies—are making their way to the modern medicine chest, according to this month’s Scientific American. The wee young of flies—larvae—munch on dead skin, cleaning bacteria from wounds. Science writer Carrie Arnold notes the FDA approved medical use … Continue reading

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Going Viral

Interesting how our language has changed. Today going viral is a good thing. But imagine 30 years ago when a strange virus struck gay men in cities like San Francisco. Going viral meant something frightening.

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I Can’t Understand Your Story

Telling your story has always been important. Imagine your elders camped by a fire telling stories. Indian Country holds stories dear.

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Making Memories

Exploring how we invent stories—and then stick to them—confounds journalists and scientists alike: how can we separate fictions from fact? I am keenly interested in how we make decisions—especially decisions built on information we gather from media that affect how … Continue reading

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Not Quite, Sherlock

We teach students to be critical—to look beyond the obvious. Question assumptions. Just like Sherlock Holmes, whose exploits are finding new audiences in 2013, we should look beyond the surface.

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