Sacred Masks

Excellent insights into Native spirituality

Desert Spirit Press

Hopi Mask Hopi Mask

“The Sale of a sacred object cannot be dismissed with the wave of a hand as a mere commercial transaction”

Philip J. Breeden, US Embassy, Paris; quoted in NY Times 6-30-2014.

The ancient carved cottonwood mask, decorated with eagle feathers and earthen pigment paint stares blankly at an observer from a shelf in a Paris auction house. The display counter is cluttered with Hopi pottery, kachina figures and sacred altar decorations once hidden in the protective darkness of a kiva.

As I studied the photograph in the New York Times article, I imagined other sacred items that could be on another shelf: a silver pyxis containing hosts of the blessed body of Christ; a treasured Torah scroll from Jerusalem; a hand copied Quran from Kufa, Iraq; a revered scroll of the Rig Veda from India; and a Tibetan Buddhist Sutra from a monastery high in the Himalayas.  I…

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About Cynthia Coleman Emery

Professor and researcher at Portland State University who studies science communication, particularly issues that impact American Indians. She is enrolled with the Osage tribe.
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2 Responses to Sacred Masks

  1. Good Morning, Cynthia.

    The other day Ji Hyang (http://naturalwisdom.blogspot.com/) tagged me in a blog Hop. I hope you will join, Here are the questions and his comments

    I am just now, doing a “blog hop”, like a blog tag, about writing.
    Would love to include your blog in the journey. It is another expression of interconnection– something light, for the summer.

    The questions are:
    What am I writing/working on?
    How does my work differ from others of its genre?
    Why do I write what I write?
    How does my writing process work?

    Just link back to one of us.

    Deep Respect for your work,
    Michael

    Like

  2. OK: I will try to hop….

    Like

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