Category Archives: film

Girls Don’t Need Math

What can you say to attract undergraduate college students to a course in science communication? When I explain to new acquaintances that my work revolves around science communication, their eyes glaze over. Boredom sets in.

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Would You Think Twice about Blackface?

This week Charlotte of Monaco donned American Indian garb at an equestrian show in France, channeling Native spirits of yesteryear. The theme was the American West. So: if the theme was the Civil War, might Charlotte show up in blackface? … Continue reading

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Onward

Although today marks the end of American Indian Heritage Month there’s no end to the issues confronting indigenous peoples and I will continue to share my thoughts about topics—some critical, some lighthearted—from an Indian lens. My argument during American Indian … Continue reading

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Indian Humor

Sure, Indians have a sense of humor. Just ask Ryan Red Corn. Red Corn, a fellow Osage with Renaissance qualities—graphic artist, filmmaker and improv actor—has created videos that highlight Indian humor and is a member of the 1492s, an Indian … Continue reading

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Bizarre Month

A bizarre intersection occurs when October 31 greets November 1. We leap from All Hallows Eve to Native American Heritage Month just by turning a page on the calendar. Halloween agitates some of my American Indian brethren. Native regalia aren’t … Continue reading

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Exterminating Indian Identity

Soon I will be bound for Phoenix to present a paper on American Indian identity and authenticity: a topic of keen interest. Critics often complain about Indian stereotypes, ranging from the issues surrounding sports mascots to non-Indians playing Native roles … Continue reading

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Enter Tonto

Social media are all a-twitter over the casting of Johnny Depp as Tonto in the reimagined film, The Lone Ranger, set for release next year. And my pals aren’t sure how to respond: it’s easy to make fun of blue-eyed … Continue reading

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New Book on American Indians & Popular Culture

Our new book on American Indians and popular culture arrives in February, right on the heels of ruminations about how politics and science are fused. Because my work examines how Native American cultural values are treated in mediated discourse within … Continue reading

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Ethics in Indian Country

The Newberry Library’s D’Arcy McNickle Center in Chicago sponsored a talk this week on indigenous views of ethics, and I was delighted to attend with first daughter Wak-o-apa (Megan). The four presenters discussed perspectives about art, appropriation and sharing from … Continue reading

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The Art of Giving

One of my friends is keenly interested in gift-giving. From a sociological perspective, giving gifts reflects important interpersonal ties. Even though my friend says she’d like to teach a class on gift giving, truth is, her interest stems from childhood … Continue reading

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