When Hate Multiplies Hate

mlk

With Hate, We Destroy Ourselves

I heard a talk today that lessened my misery that comes from looking at the headlines.

My days begin the same way:

Each morning brings a mix of interest and dread as I review the news and sip my tea.

I end up feeling awful.

Three types of news emerge:

Continue reading

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The Truth Will Set You Free

camp_arbeitmachtfrei

Alternate facts like “work makes you free” (arbeit macht frei) adorned concentration camps in Germany during World War II

When journalists euthanize the truth

For weeks pundits have stressed over political happenings from Washington D.C. that are out-of-reach for most of us muggles: how do we make sense of uncensored tweets from the powerful? The unvarnished shills from a staffer begging us to buy jewels tied to the White House? The brazen reframing of lies as facts?

Most of us are so far removed from White House shenanigans that we rely on news reports, late night talk shows and social media to glean our meanings of the political world.

Most of us knows political reality solely through mass media.

And that’s the problem: the truth has been euthanized.

How?

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Kennewick Man’s Remains Returned

Cynthia Coleman Emery's Blog

time-magazineWhy We Should Care?

Remains of a 9500-year old skeleton discovered on American Indian land 20 years ago have been making news because Congress recently approved legislation to return the bones to local tribes in the Pacific Northwest.

For 20 years I’ve studied how public discourse takes shape, thanks, in large part, to the work of graduate student Erin Dysart Hanes.

Although Erin graduated some time ago, the unearthing of the bones—called Kennewick Man by non-Indians and The Ancient One by local tribes—has been the hub in my research wheel.

The conflict arose in Indian Country when scientists wanted to study the skeleton, while indigenous communities argued that Federal law (NAGPRA) protected human remains from perturbation.

After a nine-year court battle, the judge ruled against the tribes and the skeleton was removed to the Burke Museum in Seattle, where the remains have been the subject of intensive study.

Tribal leaders…

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Kennewick Man’s Remains Returned

time-magazine

This past weekend we learned in the local news that remains of a 9500-year old skeleton discovered on American Indian land 20 years ago have been returned.

In honor of the decision by President Obama and Congress, I’ve reblogged my recent comments about the skeleton.

For 20 years I’ve studied how public discourse takes shape, thanks, in large part, to the work of graduate student Erin Dysart Hanes.

Although Erin graduated some time ago, the unearthing of the bones—called Kennewick Man by non-Indians and The Ancient One by local tribes—has been the hub in my research wheel.

The conflict arose in Indian Country when scientists wanted to study the skeleton, while indigenous communities argued that Federal law (NAGPRA) protected human remains from perturbation.

After a nine-year court battle, the judge ruled against the tribes and the skeleton was removed to the Burke Museum in Seattle, where the remains have been the subject of intensive study.

Tribal leaders long claimed that the bones—which were dug up from an area that Native people have called home for literally thousands of years—were subject to Indian laws and customs.

Two claims made headlines. Continue reading

Posted in american indian, Dakota pipeline, Kennewick Man, news bias, politics | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Kennewick Man Bones Finally Return

the-saga-of-kennewick-man

Marty Two Bulls, from Indian Country Today

I was honored to join three tribal leaders who shared their insights and stories on today’s (2 February 2017) broadcast about the Ancient One–Kennewick Man.

The skeleton was discovered more than 20 years ago along the Columbia River, and local tribes were denied the right to have the bones returned, as guaranteed by Federal statute in NAGPRA legislation.

Instead, the bones were secured at the Burke Museum in Seattle so scientists could examine them.

Now, 20 years later, the Ancient One will be returned to Columbia River tribes.

Michael Marchand (Colville), JoDe Goudy (Yakama) and Nakia Williamson (Nez Perce) share knowledge seldom gleaned from mainstream press coverage in today’s broadcast.

You can hear the broadcast online at Native America Calling, where host Tara Gatewood asks some pressing questions about what the return of the ancestor means to Columbia River tribes and our other neighbors, and the role of science and culture in Indian Country today.

My small contribution was to note that the mainstream media–for more than 20 years–framed the story along a narrow scope.

“The central issue of concern,” said one noted journalist, “is the issue of who was here first?”

I strongly argue this is a false and misleading characterization.

Rather: one central issue is:

Who gets to decide what happens to ancient bones and artifacts on Native soil?

This issue is paramount because Kennewick Man represents only one battle unfolding in Indian Country about the role that tribes are afforded in participating in decisions that affect us, ranging from ancient remains to oil pipelines.

Special thank you to Andi Murphy, Associate Producer at Native America Calling

 

#cynthialcoleman

#Kennewickman

#nativescience

 

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Let’s Turn this Argument Upside-Down

Separate, but not Separate

indians

Just when you’re about to lose hope, those clever Buddhists help you see the light.

I listened to a talk about differences and separation, and it dawned on me what Buddhists have been suggesting all along:

There is no separation.

Granted: it’s a difficult concept to accept through a rationalist’s perspective.

One teacher, writing about separation, said, “A sea does not reject water, and therefore is able to bring about its vastness. A mountain does not reject soil, and therefore can bring about its height. An enlightened ruler does not despise ordinary people, and therefore can bring about a large populace.”

The writer says there’s no separation between the mountain and soil, the sea and water, the ruler and subjects. Continue reading

Posted in american indian, Buddhist, Dakota pipeline, democracy, hate speech, immigration, manifest destiny, refugees | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Call Out the Lies

 

nicolajennings

Artwork by Nicola Jennings of The Guardian

Resist

Time to call out the lies.

You can still be gracious.

But there’s no need to tolerate stupidity in the face of bigotry, misogyny and dishonesty.

So: write, text, tweet, and follow the folks whose aim is to halt the threats to democracy and pluralism.

Resist.

Watch Samantha Bee, Trevor Noah and John Oliver.

Support Planned Parenthood, the Standing Rock Sioux Nation, the Southern Poverty Law Center and Inequality Media.

Several of my pals told me in person or on email this week they share the sentiments in my blog—the despair and hopelessness created by elected officials whom we should be able to trust. Continue reading

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